A Wrinkle in Time – Review by Moriah

Moriah is thoughtful, mature, and really smart. It makes sense that she would enjoy this complex, thought-provoking novel that speaks to imaginative readers. She is not only in my class but also part of our school’s creative writing club. Glad the group was encouraged to write reviews for the blog!

 

A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L’Engle, is a story about a girl in middle school named 9781250003430_p0_v5_s550x406Meg Murry, whose father has mysteriously gone missing for years. This has huge negative effects on her; she drops to the lowest class in her grade, she becomes closed off to others, gets into fights, and everyone just makes fun of her and shrugs her off. Things luckily take a slightly positive turn when she meets the three celestial entities, the wacky Ms. Whatsit, the intellectual Ms.Who, and the wise Ms. Which. They then lead her on an intergalactic journey through a the tesseract.

 

On this journey they travel through many different worlds and dimensions, until finally reaching Camazotz and coming face-to-face with IT-the manifestation of pure evil.

 

In this moment and throughout the whole of the journey, we see a little girl growing up and becoming stronger in the midst of the battle between dark and light. IT corrupts everything, and IT’s power is inevitable; which is why someone must stop it. But the darkness is beckoning, and light can only do so much unless someone finds the power to fight back. This is a great story that I would recommend for everyone (there is one kiss near the end but that’s about it).

 

A Wrinkle in Time is a beautiful story about the universe and the power inside each and every one of us. It brings literal tears to my eyes when I think about the theme of this dazzling story, and it’s my favorite book. What’s more, it’s deals with so many complex concepts, like good and evil, the universe, the extent of the mind and soul’s power, and so many other spiritual concepts.

 

In the face of darkness you see death and misery, and it never stops coming, never stops trying to destroy all light in the universe. There’s no stopping it no matter what, and one day, it will claim everything. Yet, in each of us, light and love can grow, and that’s all it takes to destroy evil.
While this story might seem like a great work of fiction, IT really exists; and it can take away everything. Just know all of us can do something to help stop it.

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The Toymaker’s Apprentice – Review by Noelle

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Noelle loves to share ideas, and not just about favorite books. We do a daily biography in class as an opportunity to feature scientists, artists, politicians, and more – any person someone thinks is worth knowing about. Students are invited to share their favorite people, and Noelle has shared plenty. I’m so glad this sweet, smart young lady has decided to a review to bring her book knowledge to you!

0The Toymaker’s Apprentice is about a boy named Stefan Drosselmeyer, who’s cousin, Christian Drosselmeyer (the godfather in the Nutcracker), intertwines him in a family fight against the Queen of Mice and the King of Boldavia, who are fighting each other and have both sworn to get revenge on Christian. Because of Christian, the mice of Boldavia have started a war with Boldavia, biting the princess and turning her into an ugly manikin. The Toymaker’s Apprentice focuses on Stefan’s journey to undo what his cousin did and to stop the fighting, for once and for all, as well as turning Princess Pirlipat back into a human. This sends him on a quest for the krakatook, a mystical nut which is supposed to be able to heal anything. However… is this nut real, or is it just a figment of Christian’s imagination, leading them on a wild goose chase? Read the book to find out!

This book appeals to me because of the wide variety of stuff it includes and the fact that some of it is narrated from a rat’s point of view! Heartrending and addictive, I couldn’t put it down, even after reading it for the 3rd, 4th, 5th, I-don’t-know-what time! Highly highly recommended!!!

*Note: Includes some romance and a little bit of violence, but nothing graphic.* Recommended for 5th graders and up.

East – Review by Colette

Rose has always felt out of place in her family. So when an enormous white bear mysteriously shows up and asks her to come away with him, she readily agrees. The bear takes Rose to a distant castle, where each night she is confronted with a mystery. In solving that mystery, she finds love, discovers her purpose, and realizes her travels have only just begun. – Amazon

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East is an amazing, wonderful, gripping, just-can’t-put-it-down book! Told through multiple perspectives, this story is about a girl named Rose. Rose is creative and inquisitive girl who loves to explore and wander off, much to her mother’s dismay. Her mother Eugenia, is incredibly superstitious with birth directions (which direction you are facing when you are born), up to the point where she tempts fate. Eugenia decided that she would have 7 children. One for each point on the compass except north. When her east born child Elise dies, she has a final child – Rose. Rose develops a love of weaving and sewing. When Rose is born, the shadowy circumstances around her birth lead to her whole life and even her name being a lie.

Alright, enough intro. Let’s get to the good parts (of which there are many). When Rose is around 12, things go from bad to worse. Her family is about to be evicted from their home, and her older sister Sara is close to death. Okay, maybe not such a good part, but still a good read. A week before they are evicted, a talking white bear comes to their home and says that if he is allowed to take their youngest daughter “The one who lies near death will be made well again. And you will be no longer poor but wealthy” Rose decides to go with the white bear and is taken to a palace in a mountain. Yes, the palace is literally in a mountain. There she witnesses all sorts of magic from impenetrable darkness to secret visitors. When her curiosity becomes her undoing, she must go on a great journey to right the wrongs she caused.

As you travel with Rose on her journey, it is impossible not to root for her every step of the way! 10 out of 10, and a wonderful book for anyone who likes adventure, mystery, suspense, and fantasy!

Keeper of the Lost Cities – Review by Lily Scheckner

pasted image 0Lily is the first reviewer from my new crew of 6th graders. She is sharp, funny, and seems fascinated by everything, which makes introducing new ideas and topics to her extra fun. Her enthusiasm is abundant, as you might be able to tell from her review. Thanks for taking the time to write this, Lily!

 

Twelve-year-old Sophie has never quite fit into her life. She’s skipped multiple grades and doesn’t really connect with the older kids at school, but she’s not comfortable with her family, either. The reason? Sophie’s a Telepath, someone who can read minds. No one knows her secret—at least, that’s what she thinks… But the day Sophie meets Fitz, a mysterious (and adorable) boy, she learns she’s not alone. He’s a Telepath too, and it turns out the reason she has never felt at home is that, well…she isn’t. Fitz opens Sophie’s eyes to a shocking truth, and she is forced to leave behind her family for a new life in a place that is vastly different from what she has ever known. The truth could mean life or death—and time is running out.     http://simonandschusterpublishing.com/keeper-of-the-lost-cities

 

WARNING: This book series is severely addictive!91feMZ4LegL

This series is not only a beautiful blend of fantasy, magic, and mystery, it includes funny little bits of regular teenage life: crushes, awkwardness, school and even overprotective parents. This makes the characters all the more relatable, and really helps bring the books to life.

Sophie Foster, the amazing protagonist, is the only elf (and no, they don’t work for Santa) with brown eyes and incredible powers. She is ripped away from the world as she knows it and must live in society where everything is perfect… At least that’s how it seems. Even as she begins to settle into life as an elf, making friends and even getting some adoptive parents, a nefarious plot stirs under the surface. Glittering jewels and dazzling riches conceal a secret, so deep and horrible that the elves have kept it hidden for generations. And when Sophie discovers it, her enemies are not happy.

Not only is Sophie an intricate and beautiful character, so are her friends and family. One of the things that makes this story so amazing is the complexity of every single character. All of them have their own unique quirks and their own unique faults, and that’s what makes them perfect.

I strongly recommend this series to people of every age. I have introduced it to 4 or so people, and now they are all diehard fans! However, I think it would be best for kids ages 9 – 14, because there is some violence in the later books. It is still, however, very sweet series that would be good for anyone! Thank you for reading this review and I hope you enjoy Keeper of the Lost Cities!

Steelheart – Review by Keuyrbel Zewedu

IMG_20180705_134619_2Keuyrbel can’t get extra credit for doing another review or writing during the summer, so it’s extra awesome that he emailed me. He might be done with my class, but I’m hoping we’ll keep working together in the school’s drama department. He’s as adorable on stage as in his picture. Don’t let the smile fool you. His book taste can run darker, as his review shows. Enjoy!
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Shots. Cries. Screams. Blood. Death. At the First Union Bank, Deathpoint arrives unnamedand starts skeletonizing people in the bank, then Steelheart arrives. Steelheart stops Deathpoint and forces him to surrender his loyalty to him. Steelheart continues Deathpoint’s task: killing innocents. As Steelheart gets to the last 10, a man stands up, grabs a gun, and fires. Deathpoint is down, shot after trying to kill Steelheart. But Steelheart is bleeding on his cheek. Steelheart turns and, with anger, kills him with his own gun. A boy hides in a vault. Steelheart finishes killing the people and flies, commanding one of his servants, Faultline, to bury the vault. Faultine finds the boy in the vault and lets him go. Later, Steelheart turns most of Chicago into steel and calls it Newcago. That boy is 8-year-old boy David Charleson and that dead man was his father. Deathpoint, Steelheart, and Faultline were all Epics, humans granted superhuman powers by Calamity, a star. And Steelheart is invincible. Ten years later, at 18, David joins a group named the Reckoners committed to killing all Epics in the United States. Meeting them in Newcago, he gives them his research and convinces them to try to kill Steelheart. Because David knows Steelheart’s secret. David has seen him bleed. And he intends to see him bleeding again.
 
After reading Steelheart, you will feel amazed and still have that feeling for months. This book is truly a must-read, 10-out-of-10, amazing, suspenseful, and interesting book. I learned the importance of trust, safety, teamwork, security, and rebellion from incorrect methods. What I really like about this book is how David and the Reckoners are able to work as a team to help the United States. This series will be amazing once you read it. After this are books Firefight and Calamity. There is also a short story called Mitosis. I recommend for readers 10 and up. What are you waiting for? Stop reading my review and go read the books. There are 3 books in the Reckoner stories, plus a short story.

 

Eastern’s Production of Macbeth – Review by Maggie Megosh

img_0848.jpgEastern Middle School put on the production of William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Macbeth is a gruesome tale with a large amount of blood, death, and scandal. Written in 1606, the story, which is meant to be constructed in play form, is about a man named Macbeth who is told that he is to be king.  After hearing this prophecy from three weird sisters, Macbeth, as many people would, sets off to kill the current king. This, however, didn’t make Macbeth feel powerful; it made him feel weak and powerless.

Eastern Middle School’s production of this show was a wonderful portrayal of this play IMG_0829fit with music, melancholy, and of course, murder. The actors and designers in this show have worked extremely hard and they delivered an amazing show. Someone important to highlight is Mr. Matthew Bowerman, the director of this incredible show. He is an actor himself and has brought so much to the production. His adaptation of IMG_0830William Shakespeare’s original work is amazing – the play has been brought to a whole new level. Many people’s favorite parts were the creativity and the music incorporated into the story. Macbeth has quickly become my most favorite Shakespeare play which is why I think you should take a look into this play as well. IMG_0831

 

Note from Mrs. Ray: Can’t get to a live production of Macbeth? I recommend Patrick Stewart’s film version. Want a modern adaptation? Read my novel MAC/BETH!

The Missing: Found – Review by Keuyrbel Zewedu

1.jpgKeurybel is delightful. Smart, funny, sometimes quiet, lights up when he knows the answer or enjoys a reading or a concept. In middle school, which can be dramatic and wild, Keurybel seems to stay above the proverbial fray and cruise through the day. I always love when he comes through the door to Literature class. He’s enthusiastically written two reviews, and this is the first to be posted.

 

 

Keurybel writes:

The Missing: Found by Margaret Peterson Haddix is about a 13-year-old named Jonah81wgt8F17AL Skidmore who was adopted. He has always know he was adopted. But when he and his friend Chip start to receive strange letters and Chip learns he was also adopted, they, with Jonah’s “sister”, seek to find their true origins. After discussion with the FBI, JB (Janitor Boy), a janitor working under the FBI, and Angela DuPre, a pilot attendant, meet up with Jonah, Chip, and Katherine. Talking to JB about what the FBI is hiding and Angela about how 13 years ago, a plane landed mysteriously, out of nowhere, and landed with 36 babies onboard alone, Chip and Jonah find out that they are missing kids, kidnapped from history and time. 

In The Missing: Found, there will certainly be laughter, confusion, and you guessed it, awesomeness! From this book, I learned the importance of friendship and maintaining history and time like nature. What I really liked about this book is that it puts a inexperienced 13-year kid into a life-or-death situation which just makes the story a lot more exciting and a lot more funnier. This series was also very cliff-hanging, which is to say that there is a lot of suspense, which I like. This series is one of the best in all the world of book series history. You just have to go back in time to get this series. It’s that good. Read it! I rate a 10 of 10. I recommend it for readers 10 and up who enjoy reading sci-fi and mystery, so go read it! It’s a must-read! There are 8 books in the series The Missing.