Eastern’s Production of Macbeth – Review by Maggie Megosh

img_0848.jpgEastern Middle School put on the production of William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Macbeth is a gruesome tale with a large amount of blood, death, and scandal. Written in 1606, the story, which is meant to be constructed in play form, is about a man named Macbeth who is told that he is to be king.  After hearing this prophecy from three weird sisters, Macbeth, as many people would, sets off to kill the current king. This, however, didn’t make Macbeth feel powerful; it made him feel weak and powerless.

Eastern Middle School’s production of this show was a wonderful portrayal of this play IMG_0829fit with music, melancholy, and of course, murder. The actors and designers in this show have worked extremely hard and they delivered an amazing show. Someone important to highlight is Mr. Matthew Bowerman, the director of this incredible show. He is an actor himself and has brought so much to the production. His adaptation of IMG_0830William Shakespeare’s original work is amazing – the play has been brought to a whole new level. Many people’s favorite parts were the creativity and the music incorporated into the story. Macbeth has quickly become my most favorite Shakespeare play which is why I think you should take a look into this play as well. IMG_0831

 

Note from Mrs. Ray: Can’t get to a live production of Macbeth? I recommend Patrick Stewart’s film version. Want a modern adaptation? Read my novel MAC/BETH!

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – Review by Mia Levings

Autumn_Leaves_36Mia is an unassuming, sweet, reflective young lady who I never would have guessed would be a powerhouse on the stage, but she is! In December, I went to support a friend appearing in a play, and on walked Mia playing a bratty, rude, loud character — the exact opposite the kid I’d seen in class every day for months. An entertaining surprise! You can’t judge kids based on their in-class reserve, and you can’t judge a book by its cover. Or maybe you can, because since Miss Peregrine popped up on shelves (at the exact same time as Falling for Hamlet, as I recall), it looked intriguing, mysterious, and scary. Let’s see what Mia’s got to say about it.

A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. And a strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. – Amazon

missperegrine_334x518Ransom Riggs’s Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is the best book that I’ve read (so far) ever. Adventure, World War 2, monsters and very, very peculiar children – one of the best combinations ever. Set in modern times (Florida, USA), teenager Jacob Portman has always felt a little out of place. (I know that sounds like a cliche, but trust me, this is good.) With his grandfather getting older and his childhood dreams of being a world famous explorer fading from memory, Jacob is just getting settled into the normal life of anything and everything boring. But when a terrible and unbelievable “incident” happens, Jacob realizes that his grandfather’s old childhood stories might be a bit more real than he expected. This book is truly amazing, but just a warning it is a bit scary and creepy, so if that’s not your type you might want to read something else. Also it’s a series of three and there’s a movie, all great. Happy reading!

The Girl Who Could Fly – reviewed by Jessa

Photo on 2-4-16 at 4.13 PMJessa is the smiliest kid! She loves to sit at the front of my literature class, and smiles and nods and shares great ideas. Her enthusiasm is infectious, and her thoughts profound. Also, she has a great love of hair bows, and I look forward to seeing which one she’ll be wearing as she walks into the classroom.

 

The Girl Who Could Fly, by Victoria Foster

51vkDz0GUoL“You just can’t keep a good girl down . . . unless you use the proper methods. Piper McCloud can fly. Just like that. Easy as pie. Sure, she hasn’t mastered reverse propulsion and her turns are kind of sloppy, but she’s real good at loop-the-loops. Problem is, the good folk of Lowland County are afraid of Piper. And her ma’s at her wit’s end. So it seems only fitting that she leave her parents’ farm to attend a top-secret, maximum-security school for kids with exceptional abilities. School is great at first with a bunch of new friends whose skills range from super-strength to super-genius. (Plus all the homemade apple pie she can eat!) But Piper is special, even among the special. And there are consequences. Consequences too dire to talk about. Too crazy to consider. And too dangerous to ignore.”     – Amazon

 
The Girl Who Could Fly by Victoria Forester is a fantastic story with a great, heartfelt plot, interesting characters, and good writing. The plot, though scientific, features magic and love. I enjoyed how, even though the main characters’ powers are clearly sorcery, the institution treats them like science and uses drugs, surgery, and technology to change them. In the plot, heart can conquer all, such as how Sebastian’s song managed to break through the children’s thick coating of treatment. The characters are deep, like Dr. Hellion, who seems perfect, then pure evil, then misunderstood. They’re different, too– there are no two similar characters. The word choice is great. Victoria Forester uses many metaphors, good descriptions, repetition, etc. to her advantage to create feelings in a scene. Pretty much anyone would like it, especially lovers of science fiction or fantasy. To sum it up, The Girl Who Could Fly is a beautiful and well-done book that anyone can enjoy like I did.