Leah on the Off Beat – Review by Lillian Dow Paterson

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School’s out, but we’ve got another review by Lillian.

 

Leah on the Off Beat is the amazing sequel to the book Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens 0062804197Agenda by Becky Albertalli, and it follows Leah, on of Simon’s three BFFs. It showcases the senior year (of high school) in Simon, Bram, Nick, Abby, and Leah. Although this book is from Leah’s perspective, it does show how different relationships from Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda turn out and progress. This book is amazing, and it also helps you learn about more of the background characters from Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda a definite must read. Embarrassing, Laugh out loud funny, beautifully written, this book shows a message similar to Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda and it is that everyone deserves a love story, and that’s why Becky Albertalli books are so moving and inspirational.

The Missing: Found – Review by Keuyrbel Zewedu

1.jpgKeurybel is delightful. Smart, funny, sometimes quiet, lights up when he knows the answer or enjoys a reading or a concept. In middle school, which can be dramatic and wild, Keurybel seems to stay above the proverbial fray and cruise through the day. I always love when he comes through the door to Literature class. He’s enthusiastically written two reviews, and this is the first to be posted.

 

 

Keurybel writes:

The Missing: Found by Margaret Peterson Haddix is about a 13-year-old named Jonah81wgt8F17AL Skidmore who was adopted. He has always know he was adopted. But when he and his friend Chip start to receive strange letters and Chip learns he was also adopted, they, with Jonah’s “sister”, seek to find their true origins. After discussion with the FBI, JB (Janitor Boy), a janitor working under the FBI, and Angela DuPre, a pilot attendant, meet up with Jonah, Chip, and Katherine. Talking to JB about what the FBI is hiding and Angela about how 13 years ago, a plane landed mysteriously, out of nowhere, and landed with 36 babies onboard alone, Chip and Jonah find out that they are missing kids, kidnapped from history and time. 

In The Missing: Found, there will certainly be laughter, confusion, and you guessed it, awesomeness! From this book, I learned the importance of friendship and maintaining history and time like nature. What I really liked about this book is that it puts a inexperienced 13-year kid into a life-or-death situation which just makes the story a lot more exciting and a lot more funnier. This series was also very cliff-hanging, which is to say that there is a lot of suspense, which I like. This series is one of the best in all the world of book series history. You just have to go back in time to get this series. It’s that good. Read it! I rate a 10 of 10. I recommend it for readers 10 and up who enjoy reading sci-fi and mystery, so go read it! It’s a must-read! There are 8 books in the series The Missing.

Let it Snow – Review by Mollie

IMG_8605At the risk of being repetitive, Mollie is incredibly sweet. I’m lucky because my students really are this great. Thoughtful and kind, Mollie takes in all that’s being said and then comments with great insight. She is quick to laugh at a joke or offer help to a friend. She’s also very sincere and a wonderful reader and writer.  Last but not least, Mollie has great curly hair, something I totally appreciate! While she picked a book with ‘snow’ in the title and I’m way over snow by this point in the year, I can forgive her since the book sounds interesting.

 

Let it Snow, by Maureen Johnson, John Green, and Lauren Lyracle

Screen Shot 2016-02-20 at 1.43.32 PM“A Christmas Eve snowstorm transforms one small town into a romantic haven, the kind you see only in movies. After all, a cold and wet hike from a stranded train through the middle of nowhere would not normally end with a delicious kiss from a charming stranger. And no one would think that a trip to the Waffle House through four feet of snow would lead to love with an old friend. Or that the way back to true love begins with a painfully early morning shift at Starbucks.” (Amazon)

Let it Snow starts off with the enchanting tale of Jubilee told by Maureen Johnson. Johnson truly makes the story come alive with her attention to detail and exciting plot. You’ll be on the edge of your seat as you wonder what comes next as Jubilee fulfills her destiny. After you learn the fate of Jubilee, John Green tells about Tobin as he finds love closer then he could ever imagine. His excitement and drive for adventure truly makes Tobin a realistic character, the kind that you want to be friends with. The way Green describes how Tobin acts with the Duke and JP makes him out to be the character you grow to love throughout this page turner. As you flip the page to find yet ANOTHER amazing tale waiting, told this time by Lauren Myracle, you get engrossed in the tale of Adeline or Addie as her friends know her. In a spur of the moment she lets a boy ruin her golden locks. As she cuts her hair and dyes it, Myracle leads us through a journey that makes the reader look inside themselves as Addie does too. I would recommend this book to 11+ because it includes some mature concepts but overall is a very fun read with a good message.  This book will keep you in on a snowy day and you’ll be thinking, let it snow!

Picture Perfect – Review by Julia A.

attachmentJulia A. is just a pleasant kid to be around. You might think that’s not the biggest of compliments, but in a middle school, that’s a huge deal. Julia is kind and thoughtful, and  funny. She has great ideas and makes strong connections in our literature class. The picture she chose for herself is pretty fitting, too, since she’s caring and protective of her friends. All that and she can write! I’m so glad she wanted to share this book review with the world.

 

Picture Perfect, by Elaine Marie Alphin

754348Picture Perfect depicts Ian, a 15-year-old, photography-loving boy, who tries to discover the truth behind the disappearance of his best friend, Teddy. While investigating Teddy’s disappearance, Ian begins to act strangely. He wonders about his role in the mystery and who he can trust to help him. Through his journey to find Teddy, Ian learns of secrets that change how he sees those closest to him. He discovers the pieces of the puzzle that have made up his life.

Picture Perfect is a phenomenal book; I have never read anything as intriguing and exciting. It is a story in which something is always going on. Sometimes the conflict is internal, like when Ian debates whether or not to confide in a counselor about the confusion going on in his life. Other times the conflict is external, like when the sheriff accuses Ian of withholding evidence that may be important in their efforts to find Teddy. Author Elaine Marie Alphin develops all of Ian’s conflicts by creating a compelling plot. Ian is trying to solve many small mysteries and piece them together to get the big picture. He must figure out why his best friend has disappeared and why he has mysterious gaps in his memory. He must also find out why his dad, the principal, seems to be a completely different person at school than he is at home. His dad compliments Ian on fabulous work one moment, but yells at him and locks him in the closet he next. Alphin also creates intrigue by following Ian during a time when he has many clashing thoughts and ideas. Ian is constantly arguing with himself about how to fix his problems. He wonders if he should rely on the sheriff and others to find Teddy or if he should venture out and find Teddy himself. He wonders if he should talk to someone about his dad’s changing personalities or if he should keep silent to avoid his dad’s wrath. I would recommend Picture Perfect to anyone who likes a good mystery, in which you can figure out what is going on along with the main character. Alphin drops small, subtle clues regarding the solutions to Ian’s problems, but doesn’t make anything too obvious. Picture Perfect is a beautifully written book, one that will have you turning pages until you learn how everything ties together.